Joe Ricker

Joe Ricker is a former bartender for Southern literary legends Barry Hannah and Larry Brown. He has also worked as a cab driver, innkeeper, acquisitions specialist, professor, and in the Maine timber industry. He grew up in Sanford, Maine, and earned degrees from Marion Military Institute, Ole Miss, and Goddard College. His debut short story collection "Walkin' After Midnight" was originally published in 2015. It will be reissued May 2019.

Twitter @ProfessorOpiate ​   Instagram @joericker.

"Tough yet lyrical, bristling with hard-won wisdom, these stories knock you out of any comfort zone you may have found and into the red. Ricker knows people, violence and landscape. He knows truth, too. And these stories beat their fists like drums."
—Tom Franklin, New York Times Bestselling Author of Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter

"Joe Ricker's stories are like windows with ragged blinds twisted open to reveal the lives that go on all around us, in spite of us, and sometimes are us. His characters are dark, desperate, and fascinatingly vivid.

Read Ricker and have your eyes opened."
—Gerry Boyle, International Bestselling Author of 

Once Burned, a Jack McMorrow Mystery​

"Walkin’ After Midnight crackles with danger, and this noir collection of short stories announces Joe Ricker as a provocative new talent. His plots swerve and startle as characters emerge from smoky bars, carrying grudges into frozen landscapes. Ricker’s style is at turns gritty, raw, and surprisingly tender, while his prose goes down like fine whiskey."
—Carla Norton, New York Times Bestselling Author of Perfect Victim

​​​Praise for Walkin' After Midnight:

"Ricker writes literary noir. His stories are records of murder and deceit, acts committed by individuals with such considerable damage, and/or in such dire straits, that the actions they commit seem to them logical, and perhaps inevitable. Ricker does not celebrate violence and/or amorality; his fiction talks of such things in carefully crafted, measured prose, and the calm, relentless focus of his narratorial voice presents his characters, their actions and their pasts, without judgement, so that we readers may apply our own. In this manner, his writing becomes highly moral; it asks us to look at actions and decisions that are alien to many of us, and to find empathy where we might otherwise be inclined to turn away."

—Christopher Coake, Winner of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize, and author of We’re in Trouble and You Came Back


​"Joe Ricker is a hard-boiled poet in the tradition of Charles Bukowski. He writes of lonely, scarred men, damaged women, and of haunted places we all know. These shorts are served straight up with no chaser. Like the best of noir, it's about people with few options and often no way out. Highly recommended."
—Ace Atkins, New York Times Bestselling Author of The Forsaken and The Redeemers